IELTS 3 - Writing Practice Test 2

There is no standard answer for Writing exam so please use this as a reference

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WRITING TASK 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

The chart below shows the amount spent on six consumer goods in four European countries.

Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.

You should write at least 150 words.

WRITING TASK 2

You should spend about 40 minutes on this task.

Present a written argument or case to an educated reader with no specialist knowledge of the following topic.

When a country develops its technology, the traditional skills and ways of life die out. It is pointless to try and keep them alive.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with this opinion?

You should use your own ideas, knowledge and experience and support your arguments with examples and relevant evidence.

You should write at least 250 words.

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SAMPLE WRITING TASK 1

The chart shows that Britain, among the four European countries listed, has spent most heavily on the range of consumer goods included. In every case, British spending is considerably higher than that of other countries; only in the case of tennis racquets does another country, Italy, come close.

In contrast, Germany is generally the lowest spender. This Is most evident in photographic film, where Germany spends much less than Britain. Germany only spends more than another country, France, in two cases; tennis racquets and perfumes.

Meanwhile, France and Italy generally maintain middle positions, averaging approximately similar spending overall. Specifically, France spends more on CDs and photographic film but less on tennis racquets than Italy does. Italy spending on personal stereos is only marginally greater than that of France, while spending on toys is equal between the two.

It is clear from the data given that there are some significant differences in spending habits within Europe.

SAMPLE WRITING TASK 2

The issue ‘with the development of the technology traditional skills and the conventional lifestyle die’ is a controversial one and needs deeper argument before supporting or opposing the issue. Overall, I disagree with the opinion expressed; I would like to begin by pointing out that ‘traditional skills and ways of life’ are not totally vanished from one country, culture or community because of the introduction of technology.

In many ways, the history of civilisation is the history of technology: from the discovery of fire to the invention of the wheel to the development of the Internet we have been moving on from previous ways of doing things. Some technologies, such as weapons of mass destruction, are of negative impact. Others, such as medical advances, positively help people to live better or longer, and so very much help traditional ways of life. Surely, few people would seek to preserve such traditions as living in caves. Technology will always follow its own footsteps no matter what we, some people think about it. Technology advances because we need it. So there is no way to prevent the advancement of the technology but we should embrace it positively. The generation of a country is responsible for preserving their own custom and tradition and if people feel eager to save a tradition then there is no way technological advancement will destroy it. There are many cases where technology replaces human labour to create certain things, for example, handmade sari, which is still popular in many countries. Technology, in this case, has not destroyed the old tradition but has introduced a faster and less expensive ways to create the same thing.           

Interestingly, technology can positively contribute to the keeping alive of traditional skills and ways of life. For example, the populations of some islands are too small to have normal schools. Rather than breaking up families by sending children to the mainland, education authorities have been able to use the Internet to deliver schooling online. In addition, the Internet, and modern refrigeration techniques are being used to keep alive the traditional skills of producing salmon; it can now be ordered from, and delivered to, anywhere in the world.

In conclusion, without suggesting that all technology is necessarily good, I think it is by no means ‘pointless’, in any way, to try to keep traditions alive with technology. We should not ignore technology because it can be our friend and support our way of life.

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